Office of Strategic Services: Danmark efter befrielsen, 3. august 1945

Kilder

Kildeintroduktion:
I denne rapport fra august 1945 giver den amerikanske efterretningstjeneste Office of Strategic Services (OSS) sit indtryk af den tyske besættelse 1940-1945 og situationen i Danmark i de umiddelbare efterkrigsmåneder. De berørte emner er især den politiske og økonomiske situation og opfattelserne af samarbejds- og forhandlingspolitikken og modstandsbevægelsen.

OSS var en amerikansk efterretningstjeneste, der var en forløber for CIA (Central Intelligence Agency, dannet i 1947). OSS opstod i kølvandet på det japanske angreb på den amerikanske flådebase Pearl Harbor i Stillehavet i december 1941. Med angrebet og den efterfølgende amerikanske indtræden i 2. verdenskrig blev der brug for en central efterretningstjeneste, der kunne samle efterretninger fra hjemlige instanser (såsom FBI) og sætte dem i et internationalt perspektiv. I løbet af krigen voksede OSS sig stort og var aktivt i mange, især neutrale, lande med henblik på at skaffe efterretninger om de besatte lande og Tyskland.  

Det besatte Danmark var ingen undtagelse, og med base i Stockholm begyndte OSS i 1942 at interessere sig for Danmark ved både at hente informationer om tyske aktiviteter og understøtte den danske modstandsbevægelse. Igennem krigen blev kontakten mellem OSS og modstandsbevægelsen gradvist udviklet til et punkt, hvor der foregik ugentlige møder mellem OSS og danske efterretningsofficerer fra modstandsbevægelsen. OSS endte således med at være særdeles velinformerede om danske forhold.  

Nedenfor kan du læse den amerikanske originaltekst og derefter en dansk oversættelse udarbejdet af redaktionen på danmarkshistorien.dk.

Se originalteksten på CIA's hjemmeside her

Rapporten på engelsk
Rapporten i dansk oversættelse


[til top]

CURRENT INTELLIGENCE STUDY NUMBER 34

OFFICE OF STRATEGIC SERVICES                                                                    R & A 3319S
RESEARCH AND ANALYSIS BRANCH                                                                  3 AUGUST 1945

 

DENMARK AFTER LIBERATION

Denmark has been outstanding among the liberated European countries for the orderliness of its transition from German occupation to the postwar period. The absence of severe political disturbances has been due in part to the fact that Denmark was spared the devastation of most occupied countries. In addition, the political rivalry which developed during the occupation between the resistance leaders of the Freedom Council[1] and the established political parties was submerged in the successful joint effort to establish and operate the present provisional government. The program of the new government, including legislation for the punishment of war criminals, economic reconstruction, and the re-establishment of cordial relations with the USSR[2], has been carried out with a minimum of friction between the two groups.

The lack of severe economic problems has been a basic factor in the smoothness of Denmark’s adaptation to postwar conditions. Danish industrial installations were not to any great extent destroyed by the war. Total war damage has been estimated at three billion kroner (approximately $750,000,000). Food production both during and since the German occupation has remained reasonably adequate for domestic needs. With the aid of agricultural equipment and fuel from the United States, Denmark probably will even be able to provide large quantities of foodstuffs for other European countries during the remainder of 1945.

Furthermore, the major political parties on the one hand and the active resistance groups on the other have been able to cooperate effectively in the establishment and support of a provisional Danish Government. Up to the final months of the German occupation, the possibility of such cooperation had appeared questionable because of the distrust and rivalvry between the major parties and the active resistance associated with the Danish Freedom Council.

At the time of the German invasion of Denmark (April 1940), the established political parties, anxious to preserve their own organizations, accepted Nazi rule under protest and formed a coalition government to administer Denmark for the duration. For more than three years the occupation forces interfered little with the coalition parties, their trade unions, and other organizations. In return for German self-restraint, party leaders issued periodic appeals for cooperation with the Germans, denounced strikes and sabotage, and even supported the punishment of active resistance. Such resistance as they offered was confined largely to administrative and industrial slow-downs and encouragement of the “spiritual” independence of the population.

Active Danish resistance groups were thus placed in a position of opposition to the major political parties. Such political leadership as was available to them came principally from the small Communist Party[3] (outlawed in 1941 on German demand) and the extreme rightist Danish Unity Party[4]. In addition Christmas Moeller[5], leader of a strongly nationalistic wing of the Danish Conservatives[6], soon repudiated his party’s policy of collaboration and joined the active resistance. In May 1942 he escaped to England to head the Free Danish movement[7] abroad. In July of the following year, after a period in which the German occupation policy increased in severity, the Danish Freedom Council was organized to coordinate active resistance on the home front. The established political leaders who had subscribed to the passive resistance policy of the coalition government lost influence as the rank and file of their own parties rallied to the Freedom Council. Finally in August 1943 the coalition government resigned in protest against German exploitation, leaving the country without a formally constituted government.

However, the old parties, fearing that the increasingly powerful Freedom Council might develop into a rival political institution after the war, were still reluctant to reach an understanding with the active resistance. Moreover, the fact that the continued existence of the official parties depended on German toleration of their activities remained a strong deterrent to any practical cooperation between the two groups.

Nevertheless, during the next twelve months the leaders of the established parties came gradually to accept the activist program of the Freedom Council. This was most clearly demonstrated in the general strikes which took place during the summer of 1944 as a protest against the increasing severity of German rule. Throughout this period the Freedom Council rather than the political leaders proved to be the effective authority in maintaining discipline and formulating the demands of the strikers. These developments brought the Freedom Council wide recognition in the Allied countries as the temporary substitute for a legal government and the true exponent of Danish policy.

During the last months of the war in Europe, the political rivalry of the established parties and the resistance leaders was temporarily submerged in negotiations over the composition of a provisional government to assume office when hostilities ceased.

A few days after the German surrender an agreement was reached on the composition of the present cabinet headed by Vilhelm Buhl[8], in which the former coalition parties and the resistance have equal numerical representation. The old parties, however, have received the most important key positions. Of the nine ministries assigned to party representatives, four (including the Premiership and the Ministry of Finance) are held by the Social Democrats[9], Denmark’s largest prewar party. Two portfolios (including the Ministry of Defense) are held by the Conservatives, one (the Interior Ministry) by Liberal Left[10] and one by the Radical Left[11]. The remaining nine ministers represent formally the interests of the resistance movement alone. Certain of these representatives, however, belong to the parties of the extreme left and right, which were prominent in the active resistance. Two are Communists, one a Communist sympathizer, and two are members of the rightist Danish Unity Party. The most important ministry allotted to the resistance, that of Foreign Affairs, is held by the Danish Freedom Movement leader, Christmas Moeller, who formally severed his connections with the Conservative Party.

Agreement on the provisional government, however, has not entirely eliminated the antagonism between resistance leaders and the political parties. The Freedom Council members still tend to distrust those party leaders who supported collaboration with the Germans until their resignations in 1943. The resistance leaders are said to fear the adroitness of the old political leaders and have complained that they have received only inferior cabinet posts. The resistance has persistently urged a more rapid and vigorous purge of the armed forces and government and industrial institutions. Early elections, urged by the resistance, have been opposed by the parties, which feel they need time to regain their former strength.

Moreover, several problems have arisen which may disrupt present Danish government unity along Left-Right lines. Some conservative groups, for example, favor continuation of compulsory arbitration of labor disputes while the Social Democratic Party and the trade unions have passed resolutions demanding its abolition and the return to a system of negotiated agreements. Furthermore, although all parties except the Liberals seek a constitutional amendment establishing election reforms, the Communist are pressing for more extensive reforms than the conservatives.

The old party leaders’ fear that the Freedom Council would develop into a rival political organization appears to have been unfounded. At a meeting of resistance representatives early in June the dissolution of the Freedom Council was officially announced, and its members disclaimed any intention of transforming it into a permanent political organization. The various resistance groups are to retain their arms temporarily, but will be organized on a local and regional basis.  Their aim will be to ensure the punishment of traitors, democratization of the army, and the development of a strong national defense program. These groups will presumably be disbanded as soon as elections are held.

The interim government has made considerable progress in the conduct of the purge. Punishment of war criminals has involved revision of the Danish Penal Code to provide for the death penalty or at least four years’ imprisonment for acts of treason committed during the German occupation. The law applies to informers, those who enrolled in the German war services, and officials who aided the Nazis. For the most part, sentences are to be carried out through regular judicial channels, although special courts may be set up to handle lesser cases of treason.

At least 15,000 alleged war criminals are said to have been arrested by 1 June, and approximately 7,000 Danes are expected to be punished under the new legislation.

In the field of economic reconstruction Premier Buhl has announced a government plan to invest approximately six billion kroner in projects for the reduction of unemployment. Unemployment has more than tripled during the past year, partly because a shortage of fuel has cut down industrial activity and transportation. Danish coal production has never been sufficient to meet domestic needs and existing stocks were drastically reduced during the occupation by German requisitions. Since the immediate prospects of obtaining coal from England are reported to be poor, Denmark may depend heavily on the USSR to make up the deficit. The Danes hope to reach an agreement by which they will obtain Soviet coal, cotton, artificial fertilizers, chemicals, and various raw materials in exchange for Danish exports of machinery and dairy and meat products.

In the field of international affairs Foreign Minister Christmas Moeller has cultivated friendly relations with the USSR. The appointment of a Soviet Minister to Copenhagen marked the establishment of formal diplomatic relations between the two countries. While the Soviet occupation of Bornholm agitated public opinion outside Denmark, particularly in Sweden, the Danes themselves have shown little anxiety over the prolonged stay of the 3,500 Soviet troops. The Soviet landing on the island reportedly was requested by the Danes themselves when it was learned that the Germans intended to continue resistance on Bornholm. The local Red Army Commander has officially declared that the Soviet occupation is only provisional and will be terminated as soon as “questions connected with the war have been solved in Germany.” Present indications are that any Soviet-Danish negotiations on the matter will proceed in a friendly atmosphere.

Thus far Denmark, unlike many other liberated European countries, has shown no extreme change from its prewar political alignments. The small rightist Danish Unity Party is not known to have been strengthened by its association with active resistance. The moderate parties, including the Social Democrats, while somewhat discredit by their former policy of passive resistance, have retained a dominant position. Perhaps the most significant change is the Communist Party’s growth in prestige, which springs largely from the vigorous Communist resistance activity and from the popular trend away from passive and rightist groups. Despite the leftist trend, however, there is little prospect that the coming Danish elections will show an extreme change in party sympathies.  

CONFIDENTIAL

 


Dansk oversættelse udarbejdet af redaktionen på danmarkshistorien.dk[til top]:

AKTUELT EFTERRETNINGSSTUDIE NUMMER 34

OFFICE OF STRATEGIC SERVICES                                                                      R & A 3319S
UNDERSØGELSES- OG ANALYSEAFDELINGEN                                                       3. AUGUST 1945

 

DANMARK EFTER BEFRIELSEN

Danmark har været enestående blandt de befriede europæiske lande på grund af sin ordentlige og rolige overgang fra tysk besættelse til efterkrigsperioden. Fraværet af alvorlige politiske forstyrrelser skyldes til dels det faktum, at Danmark blev skånet for den ødelæggelse, de fleste andre besatte lande oplevede.  Derudover blev den rivalisering, der opstod under besættelsen mellem modstandsbevægelsens ledere i Frihedsrådet[12] og de etablerede politiske partier, bilagt i en succesfuld fælles bestræbelse på at etablere og gøre den nuværende provisoriske regering funktionsduelig.  Den nye regerings program, der indeholder lovgivning for afstraffelse af krigsforbrydere, økonomisk genopbygning og genoptagelse af venligtsindede diplomatiske forbindelser med USSR[13], er blevet gennemført med få gnidninger mellem de to grupper.

Manglen på alvorlige økonomiske problemer er den primære årsag til Danmarks rolige tilpasning til efterkrigsforhold. Danske industrianlæg blev ikke i større grad ødelagt af krigen.  Den totale krigsskade er blevet vurderet til tre milliarder kroner(omtrent 750.000.000 dollars). Både under og efter den tyske besættelse har fødevareproduktionen været passende for de indenlandske behov. Med støtte i form af landbrugsmateriel og brændstof fra Amerikas Forenede Stater vil Danmark formentlig endda være i stand til at levere store mængder fødevarer til andre europæiske lande i resten af 1945.

Ydermere har de større politiske partier og de aktive modstandsgrupper været i stand til effektivt at samarbejde om etableringen af og støtten til en provisorisk dansk regering. Muligheden for et sådant samarbejde havde indtil de sidste måneder af den tyske besættelse forekommet tvivlsom på grund af mistilliden og rivaliseringen mellem de større partier og den aktive modstandsbevægelse, der var forbundet med Danmarks Frihedsråd.

Da den tyske invasion af Danmark fandt sted (april 1940), accepterede de etablerede partier, der var ivrige efter at bevare deres egne organisationer, det nazistiske styre og dannede en koalitionsregering, der skulle styre Danmark, så længe besættelsen varede.  I mere end tre år greb besættelsesmagten kun sjældent ind over for koalitionspartierne, deres fagforeninger og andre organisationer.  Til gengæld for den tyske selvbeherskelse udstedte partilederne med mellemrum opfordringer til samarbejde med tyskerne, fordømte strejker og sabotage og støttede endda afstraffelsen af den aktive modstand.   Den modstand, som [politikerne] havde at byde på, begrænsede sig i det store og hele til administrativ og industriel trækken i langdrag og opmuntring af befolkningens ”åndelige” uafhængighed.  

Dermed blev de danske modstandsgrupper placeret i en oppositionsstilling til de større politiske partier. Det politiske lederskab, der stod dem til rådighed, kom hovedsageligt fra det lille kommunistparti (forbudt fra 1941 efter tysk krav) og det ekstremt højreorienterede Dansk Samling[14]. Desuden afviste lederen af den stærkt nationalistiske fløj af Det Konservative Folkeparti, John Christmas Møller[15], snart sit partis kollaborationspolitik og tilsluttede sig den aktive modstandsbevægelse.  I maj 1942 flygtede han til England for at lede De Frie Danske-bevægelsen[16] i udlandet. I juli det efterfølgende år blev Danmarks Frihedsråd stiftet for at koordinere den aktive modstandsbevægelse på hjemmefronten efter en periode, hvor den tyske besættelsespolitik var steget i voldsomhed.  De etablerede politiske ledere, der havde støttet koalitionsregeringens passive modstandspolitik, mistede indflydelse i takt med, at de menige medlemmer af deres partier samlede sig om Danmarks Frihedsråd.  Endelig i august 1943 gik koalitionsregeringen af i protest over tysk udnyttelse, hvilket efterlod landet uden nogen formelt etableret regering.

Dog frygtede de gamle partier, at det stadig mere magtfulde Frihedsråd skulle udvikle sig til en rivaliserende politisk institution efter krigen, hvorfor de fortsat forholdt sig modstræbende til at nå til en forståelse med den aktive modstandsbevægelse. Den kendsgerning, at de officielle partiers fortsatte eksistens afhang af tysk accept af deres aktiviteter, havde ydermere en afskrækkende virkning på ethvert praktisk samarbejde mellem de to grupper.

Ikke desto mindre kom de etablerede partiers ledere over de næste tolv måneder til gradvist at acceptere Frihedsrådets aktivistiske program. Dette kom tydeligst til udtryk med de generalstrejker, som fandt sted henover sommeren 1944 som en protest mod det tyske styres stadig tiltagende voldsomhed. Igennem hele denne periode var det Frihedsrådet, mere end det var de politiske ledere, der viste sig som den effektive autoritet i forhold til at opretholde disciplin og formulere de strejkendes krav. Denne udvikling gjorde, at Frihedsrådet fik bred anerkendelse hos de allierede lande som en midlertidig erstatning for en legal regering og som den faktiske repræsentant for dansk politik. 

I løbet af de sidste måneder af krigen i Europa blev den politiske rivalisering mellem de etablerede partier og modstandsbevægelsens ledere midlertidigt bilagt i forbindelse med forhandlinger om sammensætningen af en provisorisk regering, som skulle overtage magten, når krigen ophørte. 

Få dage efter den tyske overgivelse nåede man frem til en aftale om sammensætningen af det nuværende kabinet, ledet af Vilhelm Buhl[17], i hvilken de tidligere koalitionspartier og modstandsbevægelsen har samme antal repræsentanter.  Dog har de gamle partier fået de vigtigste nøglepositioner. Ud af de ni ministerier, der er blevet tildelt partiernes repræsentanter, er de fire (herunder statsministerposten og Finansministeriet) besat af Socialdemokratiet, Danmarks største parti fra før krigen.  To porteføljer[18] (heriblandt Forsvarsministeriet) er besat af de konservative, en (Indenrigsministeriet) af Venstre og en af Radikale Venstre. De tilbageværende ni ministre repræsenterer formelt set alene modstandsbevægelsens interesser.  Enkelte af disse repræsentanter kommer dog fra de partier på den ekstreme venstre- og højrefløj, der var prominente i den aktive modstandsbevægelse. To er kommunister, én er kommunistsympatisør og to er medlemmer af det højreorienterede Dansk Samling. Det vigtigste ministerium, der er blevet tildelt modstandsbevægelsen, nemlig Udenrigsministeriet, er besat med De Frie Danskes leder, Christmas-Møller, der formelt har afbrudt sin tilknytning til Det Konservative Folkeparti.

Aftalen om den provisoriske regering har dog ikke helt elimineret modsætningsforholdet mellem modstandsbevægelsens ledere og de politiske partier. Frihedsrådets medlemmer har stadig en tendens til at være mistroiske over for de partiledere, der støttede samarbejdet med tyskerne indtil deres tilbagetræden i 1943. Modstandsbevægelsens ledere siges at frygte de gamle politiske lederes politiske snilde og har klaget over, at de kun har fået underordnede kabinetposter. Modstandsbevægelsen har vedholdende opfordret til en hurtigere og kraftigere udrensning i de væbnede styrker og i regeringens og industriens institutioner. Modstandsbevægelsen har opfordret til snarlige valg, men dette har partierne modsat sig, da de føler, at de har behov for mere tid til at genvinde deres tidligere styrke. 

Derudover er der opstået adskillige problemer, som kan komme til at forstyrre den nuværende enighed langs venstre-højre-linjerne i den danske regering. Nogle konservative grupper foretrækker for eksempel bibeholdelsen af tvungen voldgift[19] i forbindelse med arbejdskonflikter, mens Socialdemokratiet og fagforeningerne har udsendt resolutioner, der kræver, at den afskaffes og en tilbagevenden til et system med aftaleforhandlinger. Derudover ønsker alle partier, på nær Venstre, en grundlovsændring, der fastlægger valgreformer, men på trods af denne enighed ønsker kommunisterne mere omfattende reformer end de konservative.

De gamle partilederes frygt for, at Frihedsrådet skulle udvikle sig til en rivaliserende politisk organisation, synes at have været ubegrundet. På et møde tidligt i juni for repræsentanter fra modstandsbevægelsen blev opløsningen af Frihedsrådet officielt proklameret, og dets medlemmer frasagde sig alle intentioner om at omforme det til en permanent politisk organisation. De forskellige modstandsgrupper skal beholde deres våben midlertidigt, men vil blive organiseret på et lokalt og regionalt niveau.  Deres formål vil være at sikre afstraffelse af landsforrædere, demokratisering af hæren og udviklingen af en stærk national forsvarsplan. Disse grupper vil formodentlig blive opløst, så snart der har været afholdt valg.

Den midlertidige regering har gjort store fremskridt i håndteringen af udrensningen. Afstraffelsen af krigsforbrydere har medført en revision af den danske straffelov for at tilvejebringe mulighed for dødsstraf eller som minimum fire års fængsel for forræderi begået under den tyske besættelse.  Loven gælder for angivere, dem som lod sig indrullere i tysk krigstjeneste, og tjenestemænd som hjalp nazisterne.  Dommene skal for det meste gennemføres via de normale juridiske kanaler, dog kan der blive tale om at oprette særlige domstole til at håndtere mindre forræderisager.

Mindst 15.000 formodede krigsforbrydere siges at være blevet arresteret pr. 1 juni, og omtrent 7.000 danskere forventes at blive dømt under den nye lovgivning.

Med hensyn til økonomisk genopbygning har statsminister Buhl offentliggjort en regeringsplan, der skal investere cirka seks milliarder kroner i projekter, som skal mindske arbejdsløsheden. Arbejdsløsheden er gennem det sidste år blevet tredoblet, delvist fordi knaphed på brændstof har formindsket industriel aktivitet og transport. Den danske kulproduktion har aldrig været tilstrækkelig i forhold til at dække indenlandske behov, og de eksisterende lagre blev drastisk reduceret under besættelsen på grund af tyske beslaglæggelser. Da de umiddelbare udsigter til at skaffe kul fra England rapporteres til at være ringe, kan Danmark komme til at være kraftigt afhængt af, at USSR kan opveje manglen. Danskerne håber på at nå til en aftale, hvor de fra Sovjet får kul, bomuld, kunstgødning, kemikalier og forskellige råvarer i bytte for dansk eksport af maskineri og mejeri- og kødprodukter.

Med hensyn til internationale anliggender har Udenrigsminister Christmas Møller etableret venligsindede forbindelser med USSR. Udnævnelsen af en sovjetisk gesandt i København markerede oprettelsen af formelle diplomatiske forbindelser mellem de to lande. Mens den sovjetiske besættelse af Bornholm foruroligede den offentlige mening uden for Danmark, især i Sverige, har danskerne selv kun i mindre grad udvist bekymring over det forlængede ophold af 3.500 sovjetiske tropper. Den sovjetiske landsætning på øen skulle efter sigende være sket efter anmodning fra danskerne selv, da de erfarede, at tyskerne havde i sinde at fortsætte modstanden på Bornholm. Den lokale kommandør fra Den Røde Hær har offentligt erklæret, at den sovjetiske besættelse kun er provisorisk og vil blive tilendebragt så snart, at ”spørgsmål i forbindelse med krigen er blevet løst i Tyskland.” Nuværende indikationer tyder på, at enhver dansk-sovjetisk forhandling om emnet vil foregå i en venlig atmosfære.

Indtil videre har Danmark ikke, til forskel fra mange andre befriede lande i Europa, vist nogen ekstrem ændring fra sine politiske grupperinger fra før krigen.  Det lille højreorienterede parti Dansk Samling regner man ikke med er blevet styrket af dets tilknytning til den aktive modstand. De moderate partier, herunder Socialdemokratiet, har bibeholdt en dominerende position på trods af, at de er noget miskrediterede på grund af deres tidligere passive modstand. Den mest betydelige ændring er måske nok Danmarks Kommunistiske Partis stigende prestige, som overvejende skyldes den energiske kommunistiske modstandsaktivitet og fra den folkelige tendens, der bevæger sig væk fra de passive og højreorienterede grupper. På trods af denne venstreorienterede tendens er der dog ikke udsigt til, at kommende danske valg vil vise nogen ekstrem ændring i partitilhørsforhold.

FORTROLIGT


Ordforklaringer m.m.

[1] Danish Freedom Council: Danmarks Frihedsråd. Det blev stiftet i september 1943 som en paraplyorganisation, der repræsenterede de væsentligste modstandsorganisationer. Intentionen var at koordinere modstandsaktiviteterne og sikre, at modstandsbevægelsen talte med én stemme over for befolkningen.

[2] USSR: Sovjetunionen (Unionen af Socialistiske Sovjetrepublikker, 1922-91).

[3] Communist Party: Danmarks Kommunistiske Parti.

[4] Danish Unity Party: Dansk Samling. Partiet blev stiftet i 1936 og var i sit udgangspunkt højreorienteret, nationalistisk, og antiparlamentaristisk. Partiet blev senere aktivt i modstandsbevægelsen, Frihedsrådet og Befrielsesregeringen, ligesom det var repræsenteret i Folketinget 1943-47; i 1953 og 1964 opstillede det uden at opnå repræsentation.

[5] John Christmas Møller(1894-1948) var den mest markante konservative politiker fra 1920'erne til 1940'erne. Han var politisk leder for Det Konservative Folkeparti gennem store dele af perioden og arkitekten bag dets nationalt og socialt orienterede konservatisme.

[6] Danish Conservatives: Det Konservative Folkeparti.

[7] Free Danish Movement: De Frie Danske. Det var en uformel sammenslutning af danske aktører i udlandet, der under den tyske besættelse af Danmark brød med den officielle danske politik og begyndte at arbejde aktivt sammen med allierede kræfter i kampen mod Tyskland.

[8] Vilhelm Buhl (1881-1954) var en fremtrædende socialdemokratisk politiker under besættelsen og i den første efterkrigstid. Han beklædte flere ministerposter i perioden 1937-50 og var kortvarigt statsminister i 1942 samt i befrielsesregeringen i 1945.

[9] Social Democrats: Socialdemokratiet.

[10] Liberal Left: Venstre.

[11] Radical Left: Det Radikale Venstre.

[12] Danish Freedom Council: Danmarks Frihedsråd. Det blev stiftet i september 1943 som en paraplyorganisation, der repræsenterede de væsentligste modstandsorganisationer. Intentionen var at koordinere modstandsaktiviteterne og sikre, at modstandsbevægelsen talte med én stemme over for befolkningen.  

[13] USSR: Sovjetunionen (Unionen af Socialistiske Sovjetrepublikker, 1922-91).

[14] Dansk Samling. Partiet blev stiftet i 1936 og var i sit udgangspunkt højreorienteret, nationalistisk, og antiparlamentaristisk. Partiet blev senere aktivt i modstandsbevægelsen, Frihedsrådet og Befrielsesregeringen, ligesom det var repræsenteret i Folketinget 1943-47; i 1953 og 1964 opstillede det uden at opnå repræsentation.

[15] John Christmas Møller(1894-1948) var den mest markante konservative politiker fra 1920'erne til 1940'erne. Han var politisk leder for Det Konservative Folkeparti gennem store dele af perioden og arkitekten bag dets nationalt og socialt orienterede konservatisme.

[16] De Frie Danske var en uformel sammenslutning af danske aktører i udlandet, der under den tyske besættelse af Danmark brød med den officielle danske politik og begyndte at arbejde aktivt sammen med allierede kræfter i kampen mod Tyskland.

[17] Vilhelm Buhl (1881-1954) var en fremtrædende socialdemokratisk politiker under besættelsen og i den første efterkrigstid. Han beklædte flere ministerposter i perioden 1937-50 og var kortvarigt statsminister i 1942 samt i befrielsesregeringen i 1945.

[18] Portefølje: en ministers fagområde.

[19] Tvungen voldgift:regeringsindgreb i arbejdsmarkedets overenskomstforhandlinger. 

Om kilden

Dateret
03.08.1945
Oprindelse
https://www.cia.gov/library/readingroom/docs/DOC_0000710365.pdf
Kildetype
Rapport
Medietype
Tekst
Sidst redigeret
7. november 2016
Sprog
Engelsk, Dansk oversættelse
Udgiver
danmarkshistorien.dk

Om kilden

Dateret
03.08.1945
Oprindelse
https://www.cia.gov/library/readingroom/docs/DOC_0000710365.pdf
Kildetype
Rapport
Medietype
Tekst
Sidst redigeret
7. november 2016
Sprog
Engelsk, Dansk oversættelse
Udgiver
danmarkshistorien.dk